By now you have heard of CBD. You may even know what it is and how it works.

CBD, as we all know by now, does not contain THC. Since it doesn’t have the psychoactive components many wonders where the effects and benefits are coming from. We are here to break it down.

 

Project CBD tells us

The discovery of receptors in the brain that respond pharmacologically to cannabis-and the subsequent identification of endogenous cannabinoid compounds in our own bodies that bind to these receptors-has significantly advanced our understanding of human biology, health, and disease.

 

It is an established scientific fact that cannabinoids and other components of cannabis can modulate many physiological systems in the human brain and body. Cannabinoids are chemical compounds that trigger cannabinoid (and other) receptors. More than 100 cannabinoids have been identified in the marijuana plant. Of these marijuana molecules, tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) and cannabidiol (CBD) have been studied most extensively. In addition to cannabinoids produced by the plant, there are endogenous cannabinoids (such as anandamide and 2AG) that occur naturally in the mammalian brain and body, as well as synthetic cannabinoids created by pharmaceutical researchers.

Extensive pre-clinical research-much of it sponsored by the U.S. government-indicates that CBD has potent anti-tumoral, antioxidant, anti-spasmodic, anti-psychotic, anti-convulsive, and neuroprotective properties. CBD directly activates serotonin receptors, causing an anti-anxiety effect, as well.

 

According to Medical News Today,Jon Johnson said,All cannabinoids, including CBD, produce effects in the body by attaching to certain receptors.

The human body produces certain cannabinoids on its own. It also has two receptors for cannabinoids, called the CB1 receptors and CB2 receptors.

CB1 receptors are present throughout the body, but many are in the brain.

The CB1 receptors in the brain deal with coordination and movement, pain, emotions, and mood, thinking, appetite, and memories, and other functions. THC attaches to these receptors.

CB2 receptors are more common in the immune system. They affect inflammation and pain.

Researchers once believed that CBD attached to these CB2 receptors, but it now appears that CBD does not attach directly to either receptor.

Instead, it seems to direct the body to use more of its own cannabinoids.”